Denise Parkinson, Category Director, Global & UK – Entertainment, Yahoo! provides expert and advice and guidance on getting your first job in marketing in the film industry.

girl-with-hands-in-air-250x250

Social media has transformed the way people socialize, network and stay in touch. We’ve seen large social networks like MySpace and Friendster come and go, and other ones like Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare and LinkedIn completely transform and redefine our online trends. One thing is…

Read more at blog.brazencareerist.com

Have you ever wondered what it takes to work within the television production industry?

Below are some great articles on working in the television industry…

Want a Job in Television News? Think like an Executive Producer

If you want a job in television news, learn and listen to the experts like Doug Prusak Executive producer for Central Florida News 13.

Read more …


Zach Bubolo: Actor, Producer, and Attending Career Night! | BC Arts

Today, we’re chatting to him about breaking into TV, going commercial, and playing a baddie on GTA. Zach will be joining us for Career Night for the Arts next Thursday, Nov. 7, 7:00 – 9:00 pm, along with several other BC 

Read more …


What Being a Producer Is All About • Relate Magazine

Lynn Hendee. Continue to read on and learn more about what a producer really does, what classes should you take if you are interested in becoming a producer and what the best thing is about being a producer. L: I think the most helpful degree is Literature because the basic story of a film is what usually makes it work, but there are many degrees that can contribute to a successful producing career. A solid The media (TV, Magazines, Movies, Celebs, etc)

Read more …

 

USNews.com:

By Robin Madell

Robin-Madell

The job search isn’t what it used to be. So if you’re using old methods to try to score your dream position, you may be left standing at the corporate gates.

Love it or hate it, social media has become a mainstay in the employment game. Recruiters check it for leads, human resources directors screen candidates based on it and hiring managers use it to do their due diligence before choosing whom to interview. In some ways, your online profile has become as important as your résumé…

Read the full story at USNews.com.

Do you like to draw? Do you have a passion for the creative arts? You may be interested in enrolling into Centennial College’s Fine Arts Studio program! Take a look at the short video clip below:

Job searching can be a very stressful time period for many: the networking, the searching, the resume tailoring and the dreaded interview.

But what about the stress of starting a new job?

Some people flounder in those first 30 days trying to figure out what to do, who they should talk to, who they should impress, and how to fit into the company culture.  A few simple tips will help you thrive in your new job and reduce stress.

1. Establish the expectations of your role…and go a little further

Ask your new boss for a short meeting to review your position, learn the expectations of the role, and who the key people are around that you will be helping and will be helping you.  Once you have a solid understanding of what is what, look for opportunities to go just one step further.  By showing a little shine of initiative, you will impress your boss.

2. Educate yourself

What do you know about the company, the structure of the organizational chart, the product/service, the software programs they use, their competitors?  Look at different ways you can learn more about the company that hired you.  Background knowledge will come in handy one day!  Demonstrating to your boss that you are informed will go a long way.

3. Offer help to others

As the newest employee learning the ropes, you will typically have people who offer to help you out.  Whether it is figuring out the copy machine, learning their database program, or sharing with you the company’s approach to customer service, someone will likely always be around to answer your questions.  But what about everything you already know?  Being new doesn’t mean you’ve left all your knowledge and experiences behind.  When you see the opportunity to impart your wisdom with others, speak up and offer to help out.

4. Socialize with your coworkers

Without being a busybody, take the time to engage in small talk with your coworkers, show interest in them and share a few details about yourself.  If the company offers after work events, attend the occasional event to show a sense of camaraderie.  Being part of the company culture shows that you value the company and the people.

5. Seek out the successful staff

Every company has three kinds of staff: the superstars, the average worker and the ones who just squeak by.  Find out who the superstars are and figure out why they are so successful.  Every company has their own set of requirements – sometimes it is working longer hours, sometimes it is exceeding targets, sometimes it is having the smoothest relationship building skills.  Watch these people and learn from them.  Your own skills and experiences are unique and still important, but how you can build on them even further to help you become one of those top performers?  Integrate their successful patterns into your own.

The single most important thing to remember in your first 30 days is that you are there for a reason: they hired because they believed you are the best person for the job.

~ Melissa Macfarlane is a marketing and career specialist in Southern Ontario..

Film Open Call: May 15 Deadline Approaches

Entering its sixth successful year MIFF announces an open call for all Canadian films. May 15, 2013 is the Regular Deadline for consideration in this year’s festival, running July 24-28, 2013. Submit now for consideration as an official selection to this growing Canadian festival
and get the benefit of low entry fees.

*Cash Prize Announced*

This year our winning Feature Film receives $1000.00

About the Festival

MIFF is the filmmaker friendly festival. In addition to its goals of promoting the independent Canadian artist, MIFF succeeds in programing a festival that gets filmmakers connected to the people who can get your film out there (on average 40% of films screened at MIFF are picked up for distribution).

MIFF keeps submission fees less than *one tenth* of what some festivals this size do, encouraging local talent, holding workshops with industry leaders, and keeping the festival competition *all-Canadian* are just some of the ways that MIFF is helping the burgeoning digital indie movement help raise the bar for what the world expects from Canadian film.

If you are an independent filmmaker, a Canadian, or a Canadian resident we want your submissions to this year’s 2013 Mississauga Independent Film Festival.

For more information on MIFF and submitting visit www.miff.ca or www.withoutabox.com

FB: Mississauga Independent Film Festival

Twitter: @miffnews

Film Open Call: April 15 Deadline Approaches

Entering its fifth successful year MIFF announces an open call for all Canadian films. April 15, 2013 is the Regular Deadline for consideration in this year’s festival, running July 24-27, 2013. Submit now for consideration as an official selection to this growing Canadian festival
and get the benefit of low entry fees.

*Cash Prize Just Announced*

This year our winning Feature Film receives $1000.00

About the Festival

MIFF is the filmmaker friendly festival. In addition to its goals of promoting the independent Canadian artist, MIFF succeeds in programing a festival that gets filmmakers connected to the people who can get your film out there (on average 40% of films screened at MIFF are picked up for distribution).

MIFF keeps submission fees less than *one tenth* of what some festivals this size do, encouraging local talent, holding workshops with industry leaders, and keeping the festival competition *all-Canadian* are just some of the ways that MIFF is helping the burgeoning digital indie movement help raise the bar for what the world expects from Canadian film.

If you are an independent filmmaker, a Canadian, or a Canadian resident we want your submissions to this year’s 2013 Mississauga Independent Film Festival.

For more information on MIFF and submitting visit www.miff.ca or www.withoutabox.com

FB: Mississauga Independent Film Festival

Twitter: @miffnews

Sincerely,

Geoff Kolomayz

http://geoffkolomayz.workbooklive.com

www.geoffkolomayz.blogspot.com

Mississauga Independent Film Festival (MIFF)
co-Director: Films
miffsubcoordinator@gmail.com
www.miff.ca

First impressions are critical in the job search and you rarely get a second chance. Usually, the first opportunity to make an impression on a potential employer is with a cover letter.

The fundamental cover letter tips – be professional, use correct spelling and proper grammar. They are still important and pertain to both paper and email cover letters. But now, much of the job search has been moved online and your first chance to communicate with a recruiter comes in the form of an email.

So, what are the things you should consider when writing an email cover letter? Well, for starters, utilize your subject line properly, use a professional salutation and keep the email concise. If you want your letter to get read, you need to make the purpose clear from the beginning. Your first opportunity is the subject line and you need to make it count. Make it clear and specific to the job you’re applying for. Always include a professional salutation. If you know the contact’s full name, personalize the salutation but make sure the name is spelled correctly.

The first paragraph in your cover letter is critical so use it to sell your abilities. Use short paragraphs and sentences to give your elevator pitch (who you are, what you can do for them) and wrap it up in the second paragraph. Recruiters and hiring managers are known for being pressed for time so it’s unlikely they will have time (or want to) sift through long paragraphs to get to the point of your letter.

Keep your email simple. If you write your cover letter in a word-processing program, take away the formatting and save the file as plain text. As mentioned above, keep your email professional – emoticons, abbreviations and creative fonts and colours should be saved for personal emails.

Because many companies use applicant tracking systems (ATS) to find and screen candidates, you can boost your chances at being discovered by using skill-oriented keywords in your letter. To get an idea of what keywords could get you noticed, simply take a look at the job posting. More often than not, employers write job postings using many of the keywords they are looking for.

When writing a professional email, spelling and grammar truly matter. Uncapitalized run-on sentences have no place in any office and if you want your emails to be taken seriously, take the time to proofread for errors. You rarely get a second chance to make a good first impression!

~ Jennee Rasavong is a Freelance Writer and Blogger. Follow her on Twitter @JenneeJade.

With all the online job boards and social networks out there you would think that job fairs are just not worth your time anymore but they do continue to play an important role in the recruiting process. Here are six reasons why you should attend job fairs:

1. Job fairs offer efficiency. Many employers and candidates are in one location at the same time. You can check out multiple companies at once and this is especially helpful for someone in the early stages of their job search. The job fair can help you discover companies or industries you may have otherwise overlooked and provide you with the opportunity to make personal connections.

2. You can find out which skill set is in demand. By browsing open positions and speaking to company representatives, you’ll know where your current skill set will be most appreciated or if you have to brush up on certain skills.

3. You can learn more about employers than you can from their websites. Face-to-face opportunities like these give you the chance to see how industry players represent themselves. Find out more about the company culture, their hiring practices etc.

4. If you’re afraid of networking, this could be your dress rehearsal. Meeting people in a less formal setting such as a job fair could give you the ego boost you need.

5. It’s a good reason to get out of the house and get social. Attending a job fair could kick start a dormant job search.

6. Job fairs have evolved and now often combine with other events. Take advantage of any speaker schedules or seminar series that may be offered on the day. If you’re looking for new ideas or advice, this is where you’ll get it.

~ Jennee Rasavong is a Freelance Writer and Blogger. Follow her on Twitter @JenneeJade.

The Mississauga Independent Film Festival

Early Bird Deadline Approaches

Entering its sixth successful year MIFF announces its Early Bird Deadline
for all Canadian films. February 15, 2013 is the date we officially close
our Early Bird Submissions for MIFF 2013 running July 24-28. Submit now for
consideration as an official selection to this growing Canadian festival
and get the benefit of low entry fees.

About the Festival

MIFF is the filmmaker friendly festival. In addition to its goals of
promoting the independent Canadian artist, MIFF succeeds in programing a
festival that gets filmmakers connected to the people who can get your film
out there (on average 40% of films screened at MIFF are picked up for
distribution).

MIFF keeps submission fees less than *one tenth* of what some festivals
this size do, encouraging local talent, holding workshops with industry
leaders, and keeping the festival competition *all-Canadian* are just some
of the ways that MIFF is helping the burgeoning digital indie movement help
raise the bar for what the world expects from Canadian film.

If you are an independent filmmaker, a Canadian, or a Canadian resident we
want your submissions to this year’s 2013 Mississauga Independent Film
Festival.

For more information on MIFF and submitting visit www.miff.ca or
www.withoutabox.com

Facebook: Mississauga Independent Film Festival

Twitter: @miffnews

Monthly News: visit www.miff.ca and click the subscribe button

According to one of my old bosses, the definition of insanity is just doing the same thing over and over. Seems to make sense to me.

As I was talking to a friend the other day, it occurred to me that there are many people who conduct their job search in a rather ‘insane’ manner. How many people search for months on end with little to no results? Is it because they just keep searching in the same way? Doing the exact same thing over and over, day in and day out?

The obvious answer is, of course, to change your tactics. However, it’s not as easy as it sounds. If you are someone who is already working a full time job, job searching can be quite difficult. After all, job searching should be a full time job, so they say. So how do you fit another 8 hours into your day that you can dedicate to job searching?

The first place that many people go to is online job boards. It’s easy, it’s accessible and you can secretly do it from the comfort of your desk at your current job (Gasp! Who does that!?!?!); and that is where they stop. This is not a good place to stop. There are many, many, many more jobs out there than what are being posted online and in the newspapers.

Next up is through word of mouth – talking to people and trying to find those opportunities. Third would be through more formal networking, such as attending events or using LinkedIn to connect with people.

Let’s focus on the word of mouth and networking aspect. I bet there are a lot of people out there who feel they have great interpersonal skills and have developed great relationships with other people out in the community and in their industry. But what good are they if you don’t know how to network for a job?

The friend I connected with the other day is very involved in the community – I’m tempted to call her a networking pro. Yet she can’t seem to make her network work for her. She belongs to a women’s networking group, is active with the Chamber, volunteers at her old school – but, she doesn’t really know how to tap into these connections in terms of finding a new job. Is it because she’s a little shy, or it is because she’s worried that by putting it out there she’d be taking advantage of the people she knows? Who knows. Either way around it, the most important thing to remember is that if you don’t ask, you don’t get.

People are people. If someone doesn’t like the fact that you’ve reached out to them for any help at all with your job search, they will let you know. No need to be pushy, just simply share you are looking and give a brief idea of what you are looking for. If they want to help, they will. If they don’t, they won’t. That is all there is to it.

If your current job search technique is not working, take a step back to examine what you are doing. How can you change it? What approach are you missing? Sometimes it’s as simple as changing your resume, your pitch, your networking circle. Little changes can go a long way.

~ Melissa Macfarlane is a Career Development Professional with Northern Lights Canada.

Everyone knows that having too much stuff can quickly become a bad habit. “Less is more” is a virtue that can be applied in all aspects of life, including your job search. Reducing your resume, elevator pitch and interview to the bare essentials can help you make your point more easily.

One Page or Two?

Declutter your resume by committing to making it one page. Doing so will force you to keep your most relevant experience and scrap the fluff. Recruiters spend seconds looking at your resume, so even if you have tons of other information it probably won’t even get noticed. Narrow your career goal, condense your opening summary, edit your work experience and select the most relevant skill set to highlight.

Tell Me About Yourself.

Have a clean elevator pitch ready to go. Conventional wisdom says your elevator pitch should be between 30-60 seconds but with today’s short attention spans if you can get it even shorter than that, it could be better. You need to abbreviate what you offer, how you add value and why someone needs to hire you in a brief pitch.

On And On and On…

There is nothing worse than rambling in an interview. If you have ever caught yourself rambling through an answer then you know once you start it can be hard to stop. Avoid talking in circles and giving too much information. An interview isn’t just about the right answer; it’s also about the delivery. Deliver in a clear, thoughtful and brief way and your interviewer will appreciate it.

~ Jennee Rasavong is a Freelance Writer and Blogger. Follow her on Twitter @JenneeJade.

You have an eye for composition, colour and lighting. You’d like to take your weekend hobby and turn it into a full time career. Becoming a photographer can be an exciting way to showcase your artistic ability and with so many different avenues to choose from within photography, it’s nice to know what options are available for putting your future in focus.

If you’re thinking about pursuing a career in photography, below are a few career niches to consider:

Food Photography
Perfect for those who love food and capturing the beauty of it. Food photographers often work together with food and prop stylists to achieve the client’s vision. Shooting food can be an important tool for restaurants, hotels, food manufacturers and lifestyle magazines.

Travel Photography
An ideal situation for anyone is to get paid to travel the world documenting exotic destinations and cultures. As a travel photographer, you get to develop photos for tourism-related journalism and can be employed by magazines, trade publications and even the government.

Photojournalism
As a photojournalist, you are an integral part in delivering news and are at the forefront of capturing historical events as it unfolds nationally or internationally. You know who and what is newsworthy and understand the importance of timeliness – you need to be in the right place at the right time and meet deadlines for your editors. Today’s news picture has no use for tomorrow. Photojournalists work as salaried employees but most work as freelancers.

Fashion Photography
It’s one of the most exciting and dynamic areas of photography. It is highly aesthetic and heavily commercial. Fashion photographers attempt to capture enticing images of the garments or products in order to help retailers advertise. An interest and knowledge of the fashion industry (latest trends, upcoming trends etc) is not optional, it’s an absolute requirement.

Product Photography
This niche entails taking pictures of a broad spectrum of products ranging from cars to cell phones to billboards and even cereal boxes. It’s a perfect mix of photography and advertising. Those photos you see on Amazon and other online retailers was taken by someone whose job it is to get that “perfect” shot.

~ Jennee Rasavong is a Freelance Writer and Blogger. Follow her on Twitter @JenneeJade.

Technology, cultural shifts and changing demographics combine to create new careers all the time. Ten years ago “social media” was foreign and virtually non-existent. Media jobs were limited to print, radio and television but it now encompasses a new range of digital formats. With social media now playing a major factor in daily business life, the demand for new media positions is booming.

Here are the most common jobs that have evolved from social media:

Social Media Manager

Five years ago, Twitter didn’t exist and Facebook was mostly used by college students to keep in touch with friends and classmates. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn has experienced a massive surge in popularity and companies who want to harness the power of social media need an expert to create an online identity for them. Social media provides two-way communication between companies and its customers and Social Media Managers use these tools to encourage awareness, increase website traffic and create buzz.

SEO Strategist

Search engine optimization is the process of improving the visibility of a website in search engine results. It uses techniques that maximize a website’s search engine ranking. With search engines like Google constantly upgrading their ranking algorithms, technical expertise and creativity is required to develop content regularly that will land a website at the top of search engine results. A mix of technical and marketing skills is required as well as a deep understanding of search engine workings and web user interaction.

Social Media Analyst

Results can sometimes be difficult to measure when it comes to social media. A number of innovative tools have been created to empower companies to track stats like followers, click-through rates, fans, comments and traffic. Social Media Analysts measure the conversations surrounding the brand and establish metrics to determine which social media campaigns are working.

Blogger

These writers specialize in stating their opinions and providing information about certain topics as well as creating reviews and stimulating online conversations. Blog posts are often created as part of an SEO strategy and are designed to attract website visitors and establish an online brand. Bloggers are critical players to community management strategies and to keep customers engaged. Traditional print journalism jobs are dwindling but bloggers are finding more opportunities for online journalism which has now become the top medium for all journalists.

Online Advertising Manager

As newspapers turn digital, so do the ads that went along with them. Print ads no longer exist alone but instead co-exist with online advertising which has capabilities that print advertising could never produce. Click tracking and steering visitors off to targeted and customized landing pages are just the beginning of what online advertising can do. Online Ad Managers may work for content niche sites, selling ad programs and strategizing with clients about how to run online campaigns. Other duties may also include running the technical aspect of the advertiser’s business and track ad performance.

~ Jennee Rasavong is a Freelance Writer and Blogger. Follow her on Twitter @JenneeJade.

© 2011 Trish MacQueen

Life, in a social writer’s world, is always interesting and often we are asked to create articles, blogs, and other social media to assist companies with maintaining good reputations. In the old days, if bad news about a company, a product, or a personality within the company was released, it was usually considered in the best interest of the company to “Sweep it Under the Rug” or keep it quiet. Many companies figured if they didn’t make a statement about the issue, that is would die a natural death.

Today, that is not the case at all. With all the different forms of media available, news spreads very quickly. Social media has revolutionized how people learn about what is happening in the world and with all the people and businesses using it, you can bet someone will pick up on the story and start spreading it around. So with the social media influences, companies have been placed in a position where they must address an issue head on.

For social writers, this means that they must take a bad situation with many unhappy people who need to be dealt with indirectly and create a situation that gains empathy from all readers. In order to do this, writers must be able to connect and understand the aspects that are making these people so unhappy and then find a way to put a new and interesting spin on the situation, even if only to create a diversion.

This often requires answering unhappy people’s “real questions” with very real and direct answers. People are much worldlier than they were 20 years ago and trying to snow them will only make a bad situation worse. Unfortunately, this interaction takes a great deal of time and when you are working with deadlines that are already too tight, it is hard to find the time you need to write really well and ignoring the unhappy people is just not an option.

News spreads really fast on Twitter, Facebook, Blogs and other social media channels so cooperation often is required to “Clean Up” the situation and put a new spin on it.This means working with your peers and competitors to come up with some real and interesting news that can take away from bad news that is spreading. If you cannot find new or interesting news, then you must find a way to put a positive spin on the spreading of bad news. Sometimes you can do this simply by acknowledging the news and explaining what the company is planning to do about it.

Other times, you simply need to explain the complexities of the situation in easy to understand terms. People, often scan the news they read…not read it word for word, so this technique often works to calm the angry masses. Once explained in simple terms, many readers realize they didn’t get the whole picture and your job as a writer is to ensure that they do.

That trick alone is often enough to put the entire bad situation at rest, so the company can breathe until they find a way to get the situation under control.

~ Trish MacQueen has spent 25+ years in the freelance writing and publishing industry. She is CEO of The Word Shoppe, an internet content business and Maitland River Publishing, an electronic publishing house. Trish has been published in several print and online magazines and newsletters.

With employers asking for social media passwords and stories of employees being fired for what they posted or liked on Facebook, it’s not surprising someone said this to me the other day: “I wonder what the repercussions are going to be down the road. Are people going to lash out against employers simply by deleting their social media accounts while they are job searching?”

Of course, I find it hard to say one way or the other. However, I can tell you that in the past month a friend of mine pulled down her Facebook account simply because she was job searching. In my frantic moment of “Did she delete me!?!?!” I immediately emailed her asking what was going on. She laid it out pretty straight – she’s looking for a new job; she doesn’t think that there is anything too racy or out of the ordinary on her Facebook profile, but she doesn’t want to take any chances, even with her profile set on the highest privacy setting.

Interesting, eh?

At work we always impress upon our clients the importance of using social media in your job search and the greater importance of keeping a clean online presence. I often skim through my own to make sure there is not anything that is going to knock me out of the park. I don’t really think that deleting your entire profile is the best plan of action – after all, we live in a world of social media, there is an expectation that you are going to be found to some degree online. I’ve had a client who was turned down from a marketing job because the employer couldn’t find her online.

The trick is making sure that what is found is tidy, nice, polite, and expresses who you honestly are. As much as we like to believe we have freedom of expression, we have to remember that we are facing a world of biases, competition, and people who are just looking for reasons to NOT hire us or keep us on the team. It may not be right, but its reality.

~ Melissa Macfarlane is a Career Development Professional with Northern Lights Canada.

Where are you in your career? Just starting off, mid-career, or would you call yourself a seasoned professional?

Regardless of where you are, you all have one thing in common – you have skills to share. And not necessarily just with employers. Thinking outside the box – a.k.a. thinking away from employers – will help you with your job search. Regardless of what you may think, everyone has at least one skill set to share with others who are in a similar field. A great way to build connections and find leads is to find an organization that offers some kind of mentorship program. Here’s the trick though – you are not looking for a mentor, you are going to be a mentor.

For those who are the ‘seasoned professional,’ you have years of experience to offer as valuable insight. This is the more traditional, typical mentorship we commonly think about. Whether you are working or unemployed, you can share your industry knowledge with someone else – and you never know, perhaps your new mentee will be someone you can learn from and can provide you with leads on available jobs.

Reverse mentoring has been a trend that is rising over the past few years. Mostly seen internally in larger corporations, reverse mentoring is pairing up the senior staff with the junior – where the junior is the mentor and the senior is the mentee. Most situations revolve around the junior helping the senior to learn more about technology, social media and generational trends.

In your job search, you have the opportunity to sell not only your job-specific skill, but also everything that revolves around it. Think about the senior staff in the workplace –there are many working professionals who are lacking in the technology skills that 20-somethings thrive on. Here’s your opportunity to mentor someone on these skills that are likely second nature to you.

There are many ways you can connect with both formal and informal mentorship programs. You can check out the Alumni services department at your college or university to see what kind of mentor programs they offer, connect with your local Chamber of Commerce and research industry associations. Informally, even just attending networking events and starting up conversations with others about topics that you are passionate and informed about can lead to you learning whether that person could benefit from a better understanding – which opens up the opportunity for you to offer your help and skills for them.

Networking is vital to your job search. Making a positive impression is even more vital. So why not make a stellar impression by lending your skills, ears and attitude to someone else through mentorship. It will be a fantastic addition to your resume; you’ll build more connections and gain a great referral.

~ Melissa Macfarlane is a Career Development Professional with Northern Lights Canada.

Times have changed and an undergraduate degree is no longer rare or elite. For most entry level jobs, the minimum education requirement is a bachelor’s degree. With the popularity of online schooling gaining momentum, there’s no reason you can’t go back to school and retrain.

A key trait employers look for is dedication to professional development and education. An investment in continuing education can demonstrate your level of engagement and your commitment to professional growth. Career-long learning is necessary for industry professionals – schooling doesn’t end the day you graduate.

The demand for online education is growing and many universities and colleges offer online programs that are tailored to everyone regardless of age. The appeal of online education is undeniable – learning at your own pace and at your desired location provides all of us with the flexibility needed in today’s fast paced society. Online learning truly fits your schedule because you go to class when and where you want to.

The world is changing faster than traditional education can evolve and having the latest industry information will make you more employable than the next person. Online education can help you catch up on current trends in a desired field and update your job knowledge. More knowledge can mean more employability.

If you have been eyeing a particular position or vying for that promotion, getting that extra “edge” can help you move forward. Some positions are unattainable without additional schooling and online learning can help you break through that glass ceiling. Education makes employees stronger and many employers now offer educational benefits for work-related courses.

Online classes are generally filled with students from different places and backgrounds which can afford endless networking opportunities. If you make the right connections and contacts, your fellow students can put you in touch with other industry professionals, help you explore other companies within the industry and help you tap into a hidden job market.

Employers are paying attention to what we know and acquiring that new knowledge and latest skills can give you that “extra appeal”. Education always strengthens a resume and continuing education with online schooling is a worthwhile investment.

~ Jennee Rasavong is an administrative professional and a freelance Writer.